Saturday, March 16, 2013

Got My Hopes Up, but Nope.

Nope. It never happened. Got my hopes up, though. Back to despondency, eh?

12 comments:

Robert said...

Over at modern medievalism James Griffin states his view on Pope Frank, "The affairs of Rome don't have much impact on my daily life, and though the rituals of the conclave have medieval roots, it strikes me as odd for a medievalist to have too much invested in the outcome when in the Middle Ages, the average peasant likely wouldn't have known even the Pope's name, much less the process in which he was chosen." I think this might be the most healthy way for me and others to interact with the Petrine office. It should be little more than an abstract idea--a name inserted into a litany here and a prayer there. I used to think, "He is an absolute monarch of his own country with satellite sites in every country in the world. He has such great authority and jurisdiction that he can call my parish priest and dictate to him what times Sunday mass can be held. He should be able to clean out the bad bishops in about a month, there's only ~5,000 of them after all!" I would think this and other righteous thoughts, and see little in the way of changes. Then I would get more depressed and dangerously close to giving up the faith. Perhaps having a more medieval view of the Pope is a better way for catholics to interact with him.

A Sinner said...

Yeah I had a friend say even before all this:

"I approach Catholicism locally, the hierarchy of clergy I am in communion with, who are in communion with others, who are in communion with the Pope."

Nominally Catholic said...

Long live Pope Francis!

Kurt said...

I'm no defender of Cardinal Law, in fact a major critic of him. But there needs to be some better test of the new Pontiff than in one of his first actions he put another person down.

Law was run out of Boston on the rails. He was kicked out of a very important archepiscopal see and demoted down to the caretaker of an old church. He needed to flee his city and nation and go into exile in a foriegn country. The Mary Major job had no power yet considerable fundraising demands.

I think it was an obvious put down and don't understand why others are still harping.

A Sinner said...

Because the man belongs in a PRISON for criminal negligence.

At the very least, the fact that he's still a Prince of the Church, a cleric AT ALL...is shameful.

He shouldn't get "a situation" at all. He shouldn't be living off the good-will donations of Catholics anymore at all.

When you do something like this in any other company, you're out on the streets without a job, and they don't care how you make your living after that.

Nominally Catholic said...

The Church is not a company, it exists to help the poorest of the poor. You cannot exclude aid or forgiveness to someone who might otherwise not have a reason to live, sent to a Godless prison or on the streets to be spat at. In a church or monastery at least he can PRAY for all of us and do penance...
It's like, apply the principle of double effect here in relation to "keeping" the Cardinal and having him pray versus abandoning him to the world which would destroy him.

A Sinner said...

A benefit only extended, however, to clerics. Aside from an immigrant case here or there, they aren't sheltering and providing room and board for lay people (many more deserving) who otherwise are out of luck.

Nominally Catholic said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Nominally Catholic said...

Well, anyway, there are rumors that Law will be sent back to Boston to do a more public and just penance. I will be just as pissed myself if these rumors turn out to be false. The American public would by then be played with for too long. I wouldn't mind if they sent law to live in Boston to do "penance" for his misdeeds as his time of prayer in Italy should have by then prepared him for that.

http://www.suntimes.com/news/sneed/18949144-452/pope-francis-may-send-cardinal-bernard-law-back-to-boston.html

Anonymous said...

What about Esmerelda? Isn't she a fictional character? If Law genuinely deserves prison, it isn't the Church's mercy to shield him from the justice he ought to face in secular courts, unless the secular version of justice were perverted.

And I'm sorry, but I've been to Mass at Maria Maggiore. I'd take the "demotion" as a "promotion" of my present lifestyle any day.

One doesn't commit evil and then cry "sanctuary" and get the leading job in a major historic basillica in one of the most interesting and beautiful cities in the world.

James Kabala said...

"it isn't the Church's mercy to shield him from the justice he ought to face in secular courts, unless the secular version of justice were perverted."

My own views on this issue are much closer to our host's and yours than to Kurt's or Nominally Catholic's, but there was a lengthy gap between Law's resignation as Archbishop (December 2002) and his appointment as Archpriest (May 2004). He spent the intervening time in the U.S., although, it is true, not in Massachusetts.

I'm not sure how the myth that Law went straight to Rome originated. Maybe because there was so much going on the world then (e.g., the Iraq War), it was easy to lose track of time. Even Law's Wikipedia page was wrong once, although it has since been fixed.

Kurt said...

Yes, if he belongs in jail, there has been a great failing of the Boston DA. My understanding is that he was relocated outside the USA because he was pastorally useless here, not that he is fleeing the law.